S2E10: SEASON FINALE – The Power of Persuasion

82be38df69c18a11302a10f55d89c016Wooommppp season two finale is here. BUT we talk about one of our favorite scenes in The Dark Knight Rises: THE PIT.

And yes, we recap the scene for you (with maybe a tad bit of re-enacting. But we also talk about how to climb out when you’re entrenched in your views. Much like Bruce Wayne.

We feature a brilliant interview with Professor Bob Levine, an expert in psychology and the power of persuasion.

Listen to this week (and this season’s last) episode here:

Or download the episode here.

S2E9: Educator Ripple Effect

This week we wrap up our three-part series on Education (check out the first and second ones and catch up if you’re behind) and go all the way back to high school. You know, everyone’s favorite time in life. Hormones, puberty, and life-changing teachers.

We talk about how representation, role models, and impact can ripple out from the safety of a classroom. And then we share how BTB is really just an extension of our favorite freshman-year teachers.

Listen to this week’s episode here:

Or download the episode here.

S2E8: Place-Based Learning

Welcome back to our three-part series on Education (check out last week’s episode on The Impact of Funding here:) and our next-level dive into how educational bubble manifest in the classroom.

This week we challenge some of the typical narratives and solutions you hear about (aka “underfunded schools need more money” or “urban scholars need more magnet schools”). We feature the interesting concept and educational philosophy called “place-based learning” via the equally interesting Andrew Rayner, from Promise 54.

Listen to this week’s episode below:

Or download the episode here.

 

Happiness Initiative here: https://www.positive.news/2017/society/education/30478/woman-uses-positive-news-help-teach-adults-read/ 

S2E7: The Impact of Funding

What happens when one topic or subject can be highly variable in how it’s taught or absorbed — and what does that look like when we mix in funding into education.

We’ve been toying with this question as we’ve traveled the world and found that we have … less than great responses when confronted with alternative perspectives to international politics, wars, and cultural clashes. (#shoutout to our Sunni-Shia episode from season 1 when we tried this irl)

We talked to someone who has experienced first-hand some of the changes in how topics are taught based on where your education is funded from.

An example we referenced: The VOX video on The Rape of Nanking: https://www.facebook.com/Vox/videos/701998029987802/ 

Our happiness initiative: https://www.positive.news/2017/society/education/30478/woman-uses-positive-news-help-teach-adults-read/ 

Listen to this week’s episode below: 

Or download the episode here.

S2E6: Tomayto, Tomahto

language-barrier

We interrupt your regularly scheduled BTB Season for a fun mosaic of anecdotes and hilarious stories of how cultural or language barriers have resulted in issues ranging from plain awkward to just short of international incidents.

Thanks to all of our friends who’ve shared their stories from all around the world.

Or download the episode here.

Artwork for: Breaking the Eastern Divide

Screen Shot 2018-06-02 at 6.26.08 PM‘Cognitive Dissonance’ is a collage art piece made by stock images found on unsplash.com

In this episode, people share anecdotes of stereotypes they grew up with, and how they had to unlearn them by interacting with others.

Unlearning is a process that induces heavy cognitive dissonance. This collage tries to portray this process by showing Katanas made of flowers superimposed on an inverse of the Japan flag.

S2E5: Breaking the Eastern Divide

This week we stay in the region of Eastern Asia and take a look at breaking stereotypes down by studying some case studies from China, Japan and Korea. We talked to people from each area about how various stereotypes were built up over time… and how they’ve started to be debunked.

Check out some of our sources below as well as the interviews from people all around the world!

VOX does an incredible series on “Borders” and we sampled from their story on North Koreans in Japan: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBfyIQbxXPs 

Listen to this week’s episode below: 

Or download the episode here.

S2E4: Escaping the North Korean Bubble

Kim Han-mi watches her mother being dragged by Chinese policemen when her family attempted to enter into the Japanese Consulate in order to seek asylum in Shenyang in this photo taken by Kyodo
Kim Han-mi, aged 2, watches her mother being dragged by Chinese policemen when her family attempted to enter into the Japanese Consulate in order to seek asylum in Shenyang, China, in this photo taken by Kyodo May, 8, 2002. With no choice but to defect to South Korea, the Han-mi family including her uncle and grandmother dashed into the Japanese consulate gate in Shenyang, China in May 2002. The scene where two year-old Ham-mi looked on in agony as her mother was being wrestled to the ground by the Chinese police was broadcast around the world and her photograph was transmitted worldwide.  REUTERS/Kyodo

Until now, when we’ve talked about bubbles we’ve assumed that it was each individual’s choices or actions that kept them in an echo chamber. This week, we flip the script and take a look at the one of the world’s most tightly sealed bubbles–North Korea.

What pushes people to escape from this bubble and is there more than one way to break out? We talked to NK expert and Executive Director of Crossing Borders NK, Dan Chung.

Listen to this week’s episode here:

Or download the episode here.

 

Learn more about Dan and Crossing Borders on their website: https://www.crossingbordersnk.org/

Artwork for: Gender in the Workplace

BTBEpi03_Expectations

Check out the artist’s explanation below:

‘Expectations’ is a digital art piece, representing the state of gender in the workplace.

It was inspired by the following quote in the episode, “Women are expected to be more polished to be taken more seriously. Like if I showed up to work 100% disheveled, then I’ know i won’t be taken seriously. But if I’m too groomed and look too good then that makes you seem ditzy and incompetent. So you have to make sure that you’re presenting yourself in all the right ways.”

There are two important aspects in ‘Expectations’; the color and the shapes. The choice of colors is an obvious representation of gender. The shapes signify how men are allowed and accepted in different forms regardless of their ‘edges’, whereas women are expected to be perfect, like a circle. No edges, complete, formidable but non-threatening.